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Cross-training: The whole body routine

By Richard Hanners

Blue Mountain Eagle

Published on February 9, 2018 1:44PM

Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day use kettlebells for balance and core strength training.

The Eagle/Richard Hanners

Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day use kettlebells for balance and core strength training.

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Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day use kettlebells for balance and core strength training.

The Eagle/Richard Hanners

Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day use kettlebells for balance and core strength training.

Buy this photo
Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day do pull-ups on rings for strength training.

The Eagle/Richard Hanners

Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day do pull-ups on rings for strength training.

Buy this photo
Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day do overhead squats with barbells for strength training.

The Eagle/Richard Hanners

Clients at the Canyon Creek Crossfit gym in John Day do overhead squats with barbells for strength training.

Buy this photo

For people seeking a comprehensive all-around health program, they might consider cross-training.

Megan Sherman offers such a program in John Day at her Canyon Creek CrossTraining gym in the Western board-and-batten building at 519 W. Main St.

Sherman has worked as a trainer for 10 years and has operated gyms at several locations across John Day. She was affiliated with the CrossFit brand but has branched out on her own.

“The three main modalities of cross-training are endurance, strength and gymnastics,” Sherman said.

Her classes meet five times a week for an hour.

“Each day is different,” Sherman said.

Her clients represent a diverse background ranging from 17, the minimum age to join, to 77 years old. Sherman said she can find exercises that accommodate injuries.

“Some of them were sedentary all their lives,” Sherman said. “Here they can work together, and the exercises can be scaled to each individual.”

Four of her clients have participated in Spartan races in Washington and Idaho.

“Cross-training is beneficial for that kind of racing,” Sherman said.

Working with a trainer in a group session motivates people to exercise harder, she said.

“It’s a lifestyle — the gym becomes the epicenter for life habits,” Sherman said.

Exercises can include pull-ups, hanging abdominal work, leg raises, knee to elbows, toe to bars, a blended workout format, bench pressing, dead lifts, squats, the snatch and the clean and press. They also include running, jump-roping and box jumps.

“It’s worthwhile to learn balance and coordination along with lift strengthening,” Sherman said.

She also offers tips based on her diet philosophy.

“I recommend a diet that fits into a person’s lifestyle — not fad diets,” Sherman said. “That will help ensure that they stick to it.”

She uses an app on her phone that utilizes height, weight, gender, age and other factors to determine a person’s basal metabolic rate — how many calories they burn in a day. The high-intensity exercises in cross-training require immediate energy, so her clients need some carbohydrates, she said.

“I recommend you eat whole foods and less amounts,” she said. “And use common sense.”

For more information about Canyon Creek CrossTraining, call Megan Sherman at 541-792-0166.


Health tips


Canyon Creek CrossTraining owner Megan Sherman offered these tips to stay healthy:

• Join a community of fitness and health-oriented people. Having a community to keep you accountable is an absolute must. It’s easy to fall off track.

• Find a trainer to help you set up a program to fit your goals. This will help eliminate the guesswork.

• Start slow and track your progress. Take measurements and log your workouts. This will help show you what’s working and what isn’t.

• Track everything you eat even if it’s only for a week. This will help you see where your real problems are. Diet and healthy weight are linked, obviously, but fine-tuning the diet will allow you to get results faster and feel so much better overall.

• Run your numbers. Basal metabolic rate, or BMR, is important to know. If you’re taking in more than you’re burning, you will gain weight — more than likely body fat. Know how much you need each day and remember: You can’t out-exercise a bad diet.

• Eat good, clean whole foods. Avoid anything processed. And remember to drink water.

• Get three to five solid workouts per week. Even when you don’t want to, do something. You’ll feel better afterwards.

• Set goals that make sense and are attainable. Go for personal records in workouts, set a body fat percentage goal, inches, flexibility, mile times, etc. There’s more to fitness than just a number on a scale.

• Don’t forget about mobility. Working out can be hard on your body. Don’t forget to give it some love. Use foam rollers, go to a yoga class, get a massage and make sure you keep your soft tissues supple and ready to use.

• Use common sense. Work out, eat clean, use your body and good things will start to happen.





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