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Out of the Past

Articles from 100 years of the Eagle archives.

Published on May 16, 2017 4:55PM

From May 18, 1967: RECORD BREAKER — Breaking records has been a habit for Dennis Reynolds this season. The Grant Union senior set another school record in the javelin at the sub-district track meet in Madras Saturday with a throw of 188-6. The throw is also a sub-district record. Reynolds will be competing in the district meet in Burns.

Eagle file photo

From May 18, 1967: RECORD BREAKER — Breaking records has been a habit for Dennis Reynolds this season. The Grant Union senior set another school record in the javelin at the sub-district track meet in Madras Saturday with a throw of 188-6. The throw is also a sub-district record. Reynolds will be competing in the district meet in Burns.

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From May 14, 1992: Bruce Carey, a timber sale administrator for the Long Creek Ranger District and a C-class timber faller, puts the finishing touches on falling a girdled tree as part of the C-class instructor certification course that Malheur National Forest timber fallers recently underwent. Carey, along with 13 other instructors on the Malheur National Forest, passed the course.

Eagle file photo

From May 14, 1992: Bruce Carey, a timber sale administrator for the Long Creek Ranger District and a C-class timber faller, puts the finishing touches on falling a girdled tree as part of the C-class instructor certification course that Malheur National Forest timber fallers recently underwent. Carey, along with 13 other instructors on the Malheur National Forest, passed the course.

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From May 16, 2007: Volunteer David Packard helps 3-year-old Leah Comer weave through safety cones at the bike rodeo May 11. Amber Hensley, 9, is close behind. 

Eagle file photo

From May 16, 2007: Volunteer David Packard helps 3-year-old Leah Comer weave through safety cones at the bike rodeo May 11. Amber Hensley, 9, is close behind. 

From May 18, 1967: RODEO COURT — Reigning over the festivities of the 19th annual Eastern Oregon Junior Rodeo is Queen Cathey Lyons, center, and her court, Princess Patti Officer, right, and Princess Larraine Stewart. The annual event will open Saturday with a parade.

Eagle file photo

From May 18, 1967: RODEO COURT — Reigning over the festivities of the 19th annual Eastern Oregon Junior Rodeo is Queen Cathey Lyons, center, and her court, Princess Patti Officer, right, and Princess Larraine Stewart. The annual event will open Saturday with a parade.

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75 years ago

May 15, 1942


Grant County farmers, dealers asked to aid in bag conservation

Grant County farmers, farm organizations, grain, feed and seed dealers were asked today by J. P. French, chairman of Grant County War Board, to aid in the nationwide bag conservation program launched recently by Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard.

“Every farmer and dealer in this county,” Mr. French said, “has an important part to take in the conservation of fabric bags (burlap and cotton) needed for agricultural commodities this year. There is a shortage of bags now, but if we take care of those we have and keep them in use we will be doing much to offset the shortage and a great deal to prevent it from becoming a serious one.

“Wartime expansion in American agriculture means that approximately two billion bags will be needed for packaging farm commodities in 1942. That is roughly 500 million more bags than would be used under normal conditions. Our part in the conservation program is to see that every bag now on hand and in use does its full job and a great deal more. War has cut deeply into the imports of burlap from India and the stocks of this material now on hand must be shared with our military forces. We have plenty of cotton in the raw state, but mills having the facilities to make bagging material are operating to capacity to turn our war orders.”

Mr. French pointed out that farmers can take the first step in bag conservation by taking stock of the bags they have on hand, by sorting them for size, type and condition, and storing them where they will be dry and safe. Farmers are urged to sell the bags they will not need.


50 years ago

May 18, 1967


Lottie Carson is Grant County Pioneer Queen

Mrs. Lottie Carson of Canyon City will reign as Queen of the Grant County Pioneer Association at the annual session held Friday, June 9, in conjunction with the ’62 Days celebration. The afternoon program featuring the crowning of the queen will be held at Fraternal Hall in Canyon City beginning at 2 p.m.

Queen Lottie is a lifelong resident of Grant County. She was born in Canyon City in what was known as “Town Gulch.” She lived in Canyon City until she was 7 years of age, at which time her family moved to the community now known as Izee. Her family included her father and mother, Carlos and Dollie Bonham, and her sisters Ida and Della. Several years later her sister, Myrtle, was born.

They located at what is now the Emert place and established the first Post Office, which was named Izee. Her father engaged in ranching and originated the coveted IZ brand from which Izee was named. He also operated a blacksmith shop. In 1900 Lottie was married to Dick Carson. They had three children, Roscoe, Frances and Richard. Frances and Richard died in 1920 and 1921, respectively. The family engaged in ranching in the Izee country until 1925 when they disposed of their ranch properties and moved back to Canyon City.

For nine years Dick and Lottie worked summers for the Forest Service where Dick was road foreman and Lottie was cook.

In 1945 Dick passed away.

Lottie still lives in Canyon City in “Town Gulch.” She is very active in her St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, Rebekah Lodge and many other activities.

She is the second in her family to be Pioneer Queen of Grant County. Her sister, Della Keerins, was Pioneer Queen in 1953.


25 years ago

May 14, 1992


Depot RV Park improvements finally completed

Thanks to the regional strategies program, the Depot RV Park has been undergoing a variety of repairs and improvements over the past year, which is finally being completed.

New showers, a new hot water tank, additional RV spaces and a new picnic shelter are the improvements that visitors to the park will be able to enjoy. This all comes basically as a result of money received through the regional strategies program.

“We’ve spent about a year working with the regional strategies program,” said Don Welch, Prairie City public works director.

The new picnic shelter, which features lighting, electrical outlets, a sink and counter space, was partially built with about $12,300 in regional strategies money. According to Welch, there was also help from additional outside sources. “Ninety-eight percent of the wood that went into this building was donated by D.R. Johnson Lumber Co.,” Welch said. Michael Voigt Construction of Prairie City was the contractor for the picnic shelter while Red’s Electric took care of the wiring and McDonald Plumbing took care of the water works.

One of the complaints about the park that the city frequently heard was that there weren’t enough showers and the ones that were there didn’t have an ample amount of hot water. Consequently, two new showers were added and the old hot water heater was replaced with a 120 gallon, 36,000 watt commercial heater. These improvements came at a cost of approximately $10,300.

Because the park was frequently full and there were no RV spaces for tourists, five additional spaces were added that have a three-day maximum stay limit. These spaces all have full hook-ups and came at a cost of about $7,500 in regional strategies money. Although the paving of the slabs is not complete yet, it will be done in conjunction with the Sixth Street and Johnson Avenue project that is currently underway in Prairie City.

“We expect to close out the whole project – hopefully – by the end of May,” Welch said. “We couldn’t have done this project without the regional strategies program and the funds it provided.”


10 years ago

May 16, 2007


Blip from afar blamed for outage

The ripple effect of a power outage that started more than 70 miles away kept local businesses and agencies busy last week, fixing glitches and replacing computer parts. Utility officials say the outage, on May 6, didn’t follow the usual pattern.

Spring weather programs can bring unpredictable storms – the leading cause of power outages. “The power can go out for a variety of reasons, but it’s mostly weather-related,” said John Stearns, of Oregon Trail Electric Co-op. However, that wasn’t the case in last week’s outage, when over 3,000 Grant County consumers were left without power for nearly three hours.

The outage originated over 70 miles away and was caused when a connection from OTEC’s supplier, Idaho Power, was disrupted. “They had an equipment failure on their transmission line located at the Hines substation,” Stearns said. “They’re taking action to fix it.” Outages can cause minimal to severe damage to computer systems.

The Education Service District maintains the computer system to county schools. Although most schools were unaffected by the May 6 outage, a few local schools were unable to access the Internet on Monday. The outage blew power supplies and microwave radios that connect schools to the ESD. That was an easy fix, said Robert Waltenburg, ESD technology director, because they had the necessary supplies on hand to fix that problem. The outage also caused damage to several uninterruptible power supply units, and parts to fix them were not readily on hand. According to Waltenburg, the ESD does not usually suffer many effects from power outages because they have a back-up generator and large UPS units. “We usually weather them pretty well,” said Waltenburg.

Jackson’s Shell in Canyon City was unable to pump gas during the power outage, but when the power came back on, they were left with other problems. The power surge associated with the outage cause their hard drive to crash, leaving them unable to scan merchandise or run credit cards until the problem was discovered and fixed over 24 hours later. “We had to do everything by hand, and it’s hard to keep track of inventory,” said Greg Jackson, owner of Jackson’s Shell. A technician came from Bend to fix the problem and by 6:30 p.m. Monday they were fully operational.

Along with lost business and the cost for repairs, they had to sort through the mess of manual transactions made during and after the outage. “It was awful,” Jackson said. The best way to protect electronics is to plug them into surge protectors, Stearns said. “If there is an outage, turn off or unplug things you want to protect,” Stearns added. Report power outages to the OTEC office, regardless of whether it’s a weekend or the middle of the night. There are always OTEC employees on call, and power can’t be restored if they don’t know it’s out, Stearns said. “Everything is in place so that when the power is out, we can get power back to our consumers as soon as possible,” Stearns said.



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