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Out of the Past

Articles from 100 years of the Eagle archives.

Published on August 8, 2017 4:44PM

From Aug. 8, 2007: Front, left to right: Jacob Lallatin, Connor Smith, (back) Shaylee Joslin, Justin Joslin and Rozanne Mullin practice rafting skills Aug. 1 at Gleason Pool in John Day.

Eagle file photo

From Aug. 8, 2007: Front, left to right: Jacob Lallatin, Connor Smith, (back) Shaylee Joslin, Justin Joslin and Rozanne Mullin practice rafting skills Aug. 1 at Gleason Pool in John Day.

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From Aug. 10, 1967: RIBBON CEREMONY – Holding a grand opening Friday and Saturday in John Day was Harlan’s Chevron service station. Helping with the ribbon cutting ceremony Friday afternoon were Al Reinertson, secretary/manager of the Grant County Chamber of Commerce, and Tommy Johnson, president of the chamber. Harlan Hurlburt, manager of the new station, and Chuck Burril observe the ceremony.

Eagle file photo

From Aug. 10, 1967: RIBBON CEREMONY – Holding a grand opening Friday and Saturday in John Day was Harlan’s Chevron service station. Helping with the ribbon cutting ceremony Friday afternoon were Al Reinertson, secretary/manager of the Grant County Chamber of Commerce, and Tommy Johnson, president of the chamber. Harlan Hurlburt, manager of the new station, and Chuck Burril observe the ceremony.

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From Aug. 8, 2007: Rosie Movich-Fields, 2, of Mt. Vernon enjoys making friends with this lop-eared rabbit and other animals at the 4-H Day Camp Aug. 1 at the Seventh Street Complex. Youngsters turned out to learn about all the fun activities the 4-H program has to offer.

Eagle file photo

From Aug. 8, 2007: Rosie Movich-Fields, 2, of Mt. Vernon enjoys making friends with this lop-eared rabbit and other animals at the 4-H Day Camp Aug. 1 at the Seventh Street Complex. Youngsters turned out to learn about all the fun activities the 4-H program has to offer.

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75 years ago

Aug. 7, 1942


“Keep Oregon Green” slogan very important now

By J.C. Iler, forest supervisor

Dry forests and ranges present a hazard to the security of our people through possible loss of vital materials, draining off manpower and equipment and interference with the military effort when smoke and flame are visible to enemy agents.

Forested areas have been placed under restriction to the extent of required registration of each individual before entry and entry only for business purposes in high hazard areas. These restrictions alone will not prevent the 97,000 to 170,000 forest fires for which people are responsible each year in the United States. Only a few of these man-caused fires occur each year in the Malheur National Forest.

Last year and so far this year our man-caused fire records have been the lowest ever. The people who use this forest have a right to be proud of their record. Those who have been careless will solemnly take thought that every fire is an Axis threat to our security. This year there is no place for laxity in the nationwide effort to prevent all man-caused fires.


50 years ago

Aug. 10, 1967


Geologists, officials to view sites

Two busloads of geologists, highway officials, representatives of various federal and state agencies and Grant County citizens will tour selected geological sites in the county Tuesday and Wednesday.

Headed by Tom Thayer, geologist with the Department of Interior, and W.D. Wilkinson, geologist from Oregon State University, the geologists are working with the State Highway Department on turnout areas for interpretive highway signs to coordinate with a leaflet.

The department is planning to publish a leaflet on geology from a recreational standpoint in Grant County. The purpose of the trip is to familiarize the agencies with the project.

A briefing meeting of the tour will be held Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the John Day Elks Lodge. The tour will start Tuesday at 8 a.m. at the county fairgrounds. The first trip will be to the fossil beds to Monument, over to Long Creek and back to John Day. The second trip on Wednesday will feature the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness area.


25 years ago

Aug. 6, 1992


NOHA ‘just says no’ to Canyon City

The Northeast Oregon Housing Authority has flatly rejected a request from Canyon City City Council members to terminate an agreement between the city and NOHA to build low-income housing units in the city. “NOHA has no intention of cancelling our Cooperation Agreement with Canyon City,” said Maggie Dean, NOHA executive director, in a letter sent to Mayor Tom Switzer and council members July 30. “There have been several request by the city council in which I thought our position was made very clear,” Dean said. “We plan to hold the town of Canyon Ciy to the Cooperation Agreement they signed, date Jan. 17, 1990, which allowed NOHA to apply for and develop public housing. We are not willing to voluntarily cancel the Cooperation Agreement.”

Dean said NOHA has upheld its end of the agreement with the city, and her letter chides city council members for their position on providing public housing. “It is unfortunate that, even with the new members of the city council, you are no longer in support of public housing development.” She said an analysis of 1990 census figures identifies a need for low-income housing in Canyon City and Grant County. An additional eight housing units are planned for Mt. Vernon with five penciled in for Dayville. According to figures compiled by Dean:

· The maximum income limit for families who would be eligible for public housing is $17,800 per year. 1990 figures show the county has 58 families with an income below $5,000 (none in Canyon City); 165 families with an income of between $5,000 and $9,999 (two in Canyon City); and 176 families with an income of between $10,000 and $14,999 (11 in Canyon City). Of the 399 families countywide with an income level of less than $15,000 per year, Canyon City has 13.

· The number of privately owned, subsidized rental housing units in Grant County are John Day, 41; Prairie City, 10; Canyon City, none.

· NEOHS’s Section 8 program provides nine families with housing rental assistance in private rentals in Grant County. John Day has five, Monument, one, and Mt. Vernon, three. Canyon City has none.

“These figures show that only 60 out of 399 low-income families are receiving any type of rental subsidy. The Canyon City figures show zero out of 13 low income families are receiving any type of rental subsidy,” Dean wrote in her letter to the city. Dean also cited figures from HELP, Inc. about Grant County which showed that from April to July of 1992, they had inquiries from seven different families, a total of 19 people, that were or were about to be homeless. She said the largest reporting period was from October to December of 1991 when 12 families, 28 individuals, were homeless. “These figures prove to NOHA that housing is important to low-income families of Canyon City and Grant County,” Dean said. “We are continuing to seek property for our Public Housing Development Project in Canyon City.”


10 years ago

Aug. 8, 2007


Let’s get ready to raft

Gleason Pool was closed to the public the evening of Aug. 1, as 12 youths and 12 adults gathered there for an orientation to river rafting. John Decker, river ranger for the Bureau of Land Management, described what to expect and what to do on a river trip. He had small groups board a raft and flip it, then practice climbing back in, retrieving other swimmers.

The training was planned by the leaders of a youth program through the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to prepare for a trip the group would take down the Deschutes River. Mark Witty, leader of the young men’s program, planned the event. He has also gone with the Grant Union High School science club on similar rafting trips as the high school principal.

“There are two types of boaters,” Decker said. “Those who have flipped and those who will again.”

The audience took his advice seriously.

“I learned to pay attention, and do what you’re told, when you’re told to do it,” Shaylee Joslin said.

“Listen to what they say, or you could get hurt,” Braden Woodbury said. He was looking forward to being on the “crazy” boat.

Three boats traveled on the Deschutes Aug. 4. One raft held those who didn’t want to get splashed too much and the other two held the wet and wild boaters. They pushed each other overboard on the calm parts of the river.

“It was a blast,” said Ashley Witty, who rode on the crazy raft. The Gleason Pool lifeguard said she was pushed off about eight times.

“I was nervous at first,” she said. “But after getting used to it, it was more fun than scary.”



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