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Out of the Past

Articles from 100 years of the Eagle archives.

Published on March 6, 2018 4:16PM

From March 5, 2008: With wood chips spraying from his chainsaw, Jay Browning, who founded J.M. Browning Logging Co. 28 years ago and lost his left hand in a logging accident in 1983, carefully monitors an initial cut into a tree. The logger is among those featured on a new reality TV show, starting March 9.

Eagle file photo

From March 5, 2008: With wood chips spraying from his chainsaw, Jay Browning, who founded J.M. Browning Logging Co. 28 years ago and lost his left hand in a logging accident in 1983, carefully monitors an initial cut into a tree. The logger is among those featured on a new reality TV show, starting March 9.

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From March 4, 1993: Youngsters out to compete in the first annual Strawberry Stride Citizens Fun Race and Tour, left to right, Kevin Rapp, 158; Lanea Rapp, 143; Kyle Myers, 163; Brandi Moles, 138; John Lemons, 157; and Brandon Wilson, 159.

Eagle file photo

From March 4, 1993: Youngsters out to compete in the first annual Strawberry Stride Citizens Fun Race and Tour, left to right, Kevin Rapp, 158; Lanea Rapp, 143; Kyle Myers, 163; Brandi Moles, 138; John Lemons, 157; and Brandon Wilson, 159.

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From March 4, 1993: This picture was taken at Slide Creek in 1939 following a successful elk hunt in the Desolation Unit. The hunters included, left to right, Gene Mulkey, Ray McBride, Frank Mulkey, Doc Ward, Rodney Moore, Lyle Mulkey, Brian Crowley, Hook Leslie, George Harris and Homer Halstead. The Mulkeys did the packing starting at Road Camp Spring with a rubber-tired wagon.

Eagle file photo

From March 4, 1993: This picture was taken at Slide Creek in 1939 following a successful elk hunt in the Desolation Unit. The hunters included, left to right, Gene Mulkey, Ray McBride, Frank Mulkey, Doc Ward, Rodney Moore, Lyle Mulkey, Brian Crowley, Hook Leslie, George Harris and Homer Halstead. The Mulkeys did the packing starting at Road Camp Spring with a rubber-tired wagon.

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75 years ago

March 5, 1943


Dorothy Dale enters Army Nursing Corps

Dorothy Dale left last Monday for Pendleton, where she was inducted into the Army Red Cross nursing corps under the title of second lieutenant. From Pendleton she went to Fort Mason near San Francisco.

Miss Dale is a graduate from Emanuel Hospital of Portland and later took up post-graduate training in Denver, Colorado. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Retrum of Canyon City.

Prairie City girl plays important role in Stanford U. Opera

Miss Idelle Sullens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Sullens of Prairie City and who is a student at Stanford University, will play one of the lead roles in “The Gondoliers,” a comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan to be presented March 4, 5, and 6 by the Stanford Players and the Division of Music. Miss Sullens will play Casilda, daughter of the Duchess of Plaza-Toro.

The production has a chorus of 60 and an orchestra of 40, plus the cast of 16 leads.


50 years ago

March 7, 1968


Panthers tip Mounties for District 7 B title

Free throws in the final minute gave the Prairie City Panthers a thrilling comeback victory over Tri-County rival Long Creek for the District 7 B championship Friday in Pendleton.

With an even minute left, Mike Phillips calmly sank two charity shots to give the Panthers their first lead of the game, 59-58. Pat Voigt sealed doom for the Mountaineers by canning four foul shots in four attempts in the final seconds to give Prairie City a 63-59 triumph.

The championship game was played before a capacity crowd at the Pendleton Armory.

For coach Carl Mirich and his Panthers, it’s a return trip to Pendleton. Prairie City will meet Colton in the first round of the State B tourney in Pendleton at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.


25 years ago

March 4, 1993


First Strawberry Slide a success

Members of the Strawberry Mountain Nordic Club hosted the inaugural Strawberry Stride Citizens Fun Race and Tour Feb. 20 at Lake Creek Camp in Logan Valley.

In the children’s race, first through seventh place finishers respectively were Brandi Moles, Brandon Wilson, Lanea Rapp, John Lemons, Kevin Rapp, Kyle Myers and Bree Myers.

In the 2K race for boys and girls aged 15 and younger, the winners were Ben Willis and Amber Stein. In the men’s age 30-39 division, Randy Moles took first and in the men’s 40 and over division, first went to Gerrish Willis.

In the 5K competition for boys aged 15 and under, Ben Willis took first. In the 30-39 age group, Elinor Tatham took first for the women and Glen Stein took first for the men. In the 40 and older group, Maryann Willis took first for the women and Carolyn Laughlin took second with Dan Sherburne capturing first for the men.

In the 10K competition for men aged 40 and older, first through fifth place finishers respectively were Glen Johnston, Lance Barker, Gerrish Willis, Fritz Phillips and Ben Ladd. First place in the women’s division was Jennifer Barker. In the men aged 30-39 division, Jim Soupir took first.

Overall winners were Ben Willis, 2K competition; Glen Stein, 5K competition; and Glen Johnston, 10K competition.


10 years ago

March 5, 2008


Ax Men

Move over, chainsaws. There’s a new “buzz” in the logging industry.

The creators of “Deadliest Catch” and “Ice Road Truckers” will soon be broadcasting “Ax Men,” a new television series about loggers in the Pacific Northwest. And several Astoria characters are the hand-picked poster boys of the bunch.

The “Ax Men” camera crews followed workers with Astoria’s J.M. Browning and Gustafson logging companies as they harvested trees along the coast range. They also followed teams from Phil Logging of Vernonia and Stump Branch Logging of Banks.

After three months of filming late last year, the show premieres March 9 on the History Channel, highlighting the dangers and drama of logging and documenting what it takes to make it in the industry.

Over the course of 13 episodes, the series will compare modern-day loggers with the rugged, pioneering “legends” of the American West and take a sweeping look at the deep-rooted history of the profession. Local loggers say they hope it will clear up misconceptions about the work they do and give their beleaguered industry a boost.



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