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Dog trainers provide lesson in ‘obility’

Blue Mountain Eagle

Published on June 29, 2016 7:55PM

Flora Steffan, from Herd U Needed A Home dog rescue, and agility dog trainer Carole Mann, both of Bend, taught an “obility” — obedience and agility — class June 25 and 26 in Canyon City.

Contributed photo/Kathy Moss

Flora Steffan, from Herd U Needed A Home dog rescue, and agility dog trainer Carole Mann, both of Bend, taught an “obility” — obedience and agility — class June 25 and 26 in Canyon City.

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Agility dog trainer Carole Mann, left, works with Dustin Dexter, Baker City, and his dog, Chloe, at a training June 25 and 26 in Canyon City.

Contributed photo/Kathy Moss

Agility dog trainer Carole Mann, left, works with Dustin Dexter, Baker City, and his dog, Chloe, at a training June 25 and 26 in Canyon City.

Buy this photo

About a dozen people and their dogs got a lesson in “obility” — obedience and agility — June 25 and 26 in Canyon City.

Prairie City resident Kathy Moss hosted a clinic at Canyon City Park with Bend trainers Flora Steffan, Herd U Needed a Home dog rescue, and agility trainer Carole Mann.

“They made a great team as they shared their experience of the unspoken communication of the canine language from Flora’s perspective and the attempt of ‘try and achievement’ from Carole’s experience,” Moss said. “Each participant brought their questions, concerns and issues of dog handling and communication to the forefront to be discussed and faced — from trust issues, hyperactivity, to boredom to critiquing finer points of agility and obedience.”

Moss said the trainers were full of information from the hundreds of dogs they have worked with.

She said the attendees learned to work with the dogs in a positive environment with games and simple challenges for the dogs to accomplish to receive awards.

“In doing so, the dog engages with the owner and becomes more attentive in the partnership between dogs and people, and the person is more receptive to the dog’s attempt of communication and accomplishments,” she said.

Moss said the trainers brought their agility equipment, and the dogs worked on tunnels and ramps. She said they also worked on recall and targeting.

This clinic filled up fast, she said, and future clinics will likely be limited to five dogs. Moss said anyone interested in a future clinic or more information about dog training can contact her, 541-620-0746, akmoss12@gmail.com.



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