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Point and shoot

Simulations test officers, public

Published on May 2, 2017 4:50PM

John Day Police Chief Richard Gray demonstrates the proper way to hold a gun to German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt using a training prop April 20.

The Eagle/Rylan Boggs

John Day Police Chief Richard Gray demonstrates the proper way to hold a gun to German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt using a training prop April 20.

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German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt uses the MILO-Range law enforcement training system for target practice at the John Day police station April 20.

The Eagle/Rylan Boggs

German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt uses the MILO-Range law enforcement training system for target practice at the John Day police station April 20.

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German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt performs a virtual traffic stop using the MILO-Range law enforcement training system at the John Day police station April 20.

The Eagle/Rylan Boggs

German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt performs a virtual traffic stop using the MILO-Range law enforcement training system at the John Day police station April 20.

Buy this photo

Simulations test officers, public

By Rylan Boggs

Blue Mountain Eagle

German foreign exchange student Antonia Mueller-Axt has just pulled over two men driving a car without license plates in a bad part of town.

They both exit the vehicle and begin yelling and swearing at her as she steps out of her patrol car. She commands them to stop but they both reach for guns in their waist bands. She shoots one, but the other draws his weapon and fires.

The simulation stops. The screen reads: “You did not take action.”

Mueller-Axt is fine, and the two men are just film actors in a police training simulator called MILO-Range.

The simulator was loaned to the John Day Police Department from the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training. All John Day officers are required to use the simulator, Police Chief Richard Gray said.

The simulator contains a variety of scenarios police officers would encounter in the field, including active shooters and suicidal subjects. Officers have only seconds to analyze the situation, give commands to the simulator and make a decision whether or not to shoot.

Officers have replica pepper spray, pistol, stun gun, flashlight and extra magazines they can use.

“It gives the officer a safe environment to train and engage a situation,” Gray said.

Scenarios require the user to determine whether or not subjects have the means, intent and opportunity to kill or do harm.

Means refers to the subject’s ability to inflict harm, such as having a weapon. Intent refers to showing behavior indicating they wish to harm you. Opportunity refers to being at a range or in a situation where they can cause harm.

Gray makes the simulator available to those wishing to use it so they can see what police officers undergo.

“It’s important the public sees both sides,” Gray said. “If the public can see how quick things happen, maybe they will have a better understanding of what we go through on a day to day basis.”





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