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Rapp remains in jail on Dixie Creek Campground attempted murder charge

Judge issues sentences in eluding and child support cases.

By Richard Hanners

Blue Mountain Eagle

Published on December 15, 2017 4:05PM

Kevin Rapp

Kevin Rapp


The John Day man accused of shooting a Eugene man at the Dixie Creek Campground on Oct. 16 remains in jail as the discovery process in his case continues.

Kevin J. Rapp, 32, is charged with attempted murder, first-degree assault and unlawful use of a weapon. His bail was set at $250,000.

According to an Oct. 20 press release by Grant County District Attorney Jim Carpenter, Kyler Weisenback was awoken in the early morning hours while camping and was shot. Weisenback was flown to Bend and then Portland for treatment.

Rapp was also charged with misdemeanor possession of methamphetamine on Oct. 16.

Status hearings in the case were held Nov. 30 and Dec. 13. Grant County Circuit Court Judge William D. Cramer Jr. expressed concern at the first hearing about the number of computer disks attached to the case. Defense attorney Rob Raschio said some of the disks contained video from law enforcement body cameras and would take time to review.

Rapp appeared in court for the second hearing wearing jail attire. Raschio said he had received the Oregon State Police report for the case but hadn’t seen the ballistics report. The case was circumstantial without the ballistics report, he said.

Carpenter said he disagreed with that characterization, and Cramer noted that attorneys typically describe circumstances differently. Raschio said he expected to request a bail reduction, and Cramer scheduled a third status hearing for 1 p.m. Jan. 16.

The five-minute Dec. 13 status hearing was followed by a 10-minute contempt of court trial. Rapp was charged with disobeying a court order to pay child support when he had the ability to pay.

Rapp pleaded guilty to the contempt charge in a plea petition that recommended 20 days in jail. A victim intervention specialist said Rapp’s ex-wife had seen the petition and had “general frustration with the case.” Cramer agreed with the recommendation and sentenced Rapp to 20 days in jail concurrent with another sentence. He imposed no financial obligations, saying he wanted Rapp to pay child support to his ex-wife.

Rapp was charged May 23 with eluding a police officer, reckless driving and driving with a suspended or revoked license. Cramer sentenced him on Nov. 9 to 60 days in jail, 24 months probation and $535 in fines and fees. Rapp filed notice Dec. 6 that he intends to appeal the judgment.

Rapp has faced numerous misdemeanor and felony charges since May 2007. Many of the charges were dismissed, but he was convicted of theft, disorderly conduct, drug possession, wildlife violations and various traffic offenses, according to court records. He was also sentenced in 2015 to 18 months probation for not obeying a court order to pay child support.

In November 2009, Rapp was charged with menacing, criminal mischief, second-degree assault and disorderly conduct following an incident involving a high-speed chase near Dixie Summit. He pleaded guilty to second-degree disorderly conduct, and the other charges were dismissed.

The incident began with a confrontation between two groups of men in two vehicles in the North Fork Bridge Creek area. A chase ensued, with the vehicles leaving a dirt road and turning onto Highway 26 heading east.

The vehicles passed through a construction zone at high speeds, forcing a worker to leap out of the way. Witnesses said they saw one vehicle bump the other. The chase ended at Austin House, where occupants in the first vehicle were able to get out and call police.

Rapp was arrested that day but was later released to undergo treatment for a fracture and broken nose he suffered during the initial confrontation. His father, Gary R. Rapp, later pleaded guilty to second-degree attempted assault, reckless driving, recklessly endangering a highway worker and menacing. A third man in their car, Cody B. Sederlin, pleaded guilty to second-degree disorderly conduct, and two charges of menacing were dismissed.



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