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Voters overturn Grant County marijuana ban

Myers wins close bid for re-election as county judge.

Blue Mountain Eagle

Published on May 15, 2018 8:32PM

Last changed on May 16, 2018 11:30AM

Marijuana businesses will soon be legal in Grant County. An initiative repealing the county’s ban garnered 53 percent of the votes, according to the final unofficial results.

EO Media Group file photo

Marijuana businesses will soon be legal in Grant County. An initiative repealing the county’s ban garnered 53 percent of the votes, according to the final unofficial results.

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Marijuana businesses will soon be legal in Grant County.

An initiative to repeal the county’s ban on marijuana businesses secured 53 percent of the votes, according to the final unofficial election results released Tuesday evening by Grant County Clerk Brenda Percy.

Of 3,179 votes counted, 1,687 voted to allow marijuana-related businesses that the state considers legal with 1,492 votes against it.

Incumbent County Judge Scott Myers won a close bid for re-election against County Commissioner Jim Hamsher. Myers won 1,653-to-1,584 for another term.

In the race to fill County Commissioner Boyd Britton’s seat, Sam Palmer and Gordon Larson will move on to the November ballot. Palmer received 42 percent of the vote, 1,394, and Larson received 34 percent, 1,133, according to early results. Archie Osburn received 504 votes, Tanner Elliott received 183, Dave Rose received 40 and Richie Colbeth received 39.

Incumbent Justice of the Peace Kathy Stinnett has secured re-election with 76.6 percent of the vote against challenger Harold Preston, who received 23 percent.

Incumbent District Attorney Jim Carpenter received 96 percent of the votes running unopposed.

Percy said 24 signature envelopes were challenged — either unsigned or with a signature that did not match records — that have not been processed. They have been mailed letters informing them they have until 5 p.m. May 29 to correct the issue.

Percy said two additional ballots received on time in other counties have yet to be processed as well.

Of 5,193 eligible voters, Percy said she received 3,417 signature envelopes, a turnout of 65.8 percent. One envelope, however, contained two ballots, both of which had to be rejected because it could not be determined which ballot corresponded with the valid signature envelope.

Percy wanted to remind voters not to send more than one ballot per signature envelope.



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