Home News Free

Pet and livestock supplies donated for fire victims

By Nancy McCarthy

Blue Mountain Eagle

Published on August 31, 2015 11:43AM

Last changed on September 1, 2015 4:44PM

Elaine Mezzo, board member for New Hope for Eastern Oregon Animals, was instrumental in obtaining donations to help local pets and livestock affected by the Canyon Creek Complex fire. “We wouldn’t have been able to do this without her commitment to ensuring every displaced animal receives care,” said Lisa Weigum, chairwoman of the organization’s Grant County chapter.

Contributed photo

Elaine Mezzo, board member for New Hope for Eastern Oregon Animals, was instrumental in obtaining donations to help local pets and livestock affected by the Canyon Creek Complex fire. “We wouldn’t have been able to do this without her commitment to ensuring every displaced animal receives care,” said Lisa Weigum, chairwoman of the organization’s Grant County chapter.

Buy this photo

JOHN DAY — Pets that have been affected by the Canyon Creek Complex fire aren’t being forgotten.

An estimated $35,000 in monetary donations and pet supplies have been given to New Hope for Eastern Oregon Animals, a local animal rescue organization.

“It’s incredible and remarkable how much has been donated,” said Lisa Weigum, chairwoman of the Grant County chapter.

Weigum and the organization’s board members and volunteers are stationed at the Grant County Fairgrounds Pavilion to help distribute the goods to those who have lost their homes or who have been displaced or otherwise were affected by the fire.

At least 124 animals are listed as needing assistance, but, Weigum said, “We think it’s considerably higher.”

In addition to dogs and cats, there are horses, cows, chickens and other animals that need help.

Donations are coming from throughout Oregon and Washington from individuals and companies. Big R and Pioneer Feed and Farm Supply are among the local businesses that have provided livestock supplies; Petco gave a $5,000 grant and PetSmart, $2,000.

“People in the animal welfare community are very giving,” Weigum said.

In addition to money and food, collars, toys, treats, pet carriers, beds and pet bowls also were donated.

“We could open a pet shop without the pets,” she said.

Weigum and her crew ask those who come to the pavilion for personal supplies if they need anything for their animals.

“We’ve been in touch with most of the folks,” Weigum said, but, she added, some people are reluctant to ask for help. “Advocates,” who want to speak on behalf of the fire-affected residents are welcome, she said. The group also will deliver items.

Supplies will be provided as long as they’re needed.

“If there’s anything we can do to alleviate stress, we want to,” Weigum said. “At a time like this, people get comfort from their companion animals.”

Those who want to donate supplies should visit the pavilion to find out what is needed first, Weigum said.



Marketplace

Share and Discuss

Guidelines

User Comments