Grant County People: Quelland attains captain status for emergency services in Alaska

Lesley Crane Quelland, daughter of Carolyn Stout of John Day and David Crane of Soldotna, has recently been promoted to captain of the Central Emergency Services in Soldotna, Alaska. The Eagle/HEATHER SHEEDY

Lesley Crane Quelland has recently been promoted to captain of the Central Emergency Services in Soldotna, Alaska. She is the daughter of Carolyn Stout of John Day and David Crane of Soldotna.

According to a feature article published in the Aug. 4, Peninsula Clarion of Soldotna/Kenai, Alaska, Quelland became interested in emergency services while living in Oregon. In 1985 she was employed with CES in Alaska as a secretary and enrolled in a paramedics training program in Denver in 1989. After working her way through the ranks, she was promoted in October 2002 to captain, a position that places her in charge of "each decision made at a scene."

As a paramedic-engineer, Quelland's work includes firefighting as well as emergency medical technician. In addition, her family life is very busy - husband, Robbie, is a sergeant with the Soldotna Police Department and they have a family at home.

Mother Carolyn Stout said Lesley showed interest in helping others while living in Grant County and began EMT training at Blue Mountain Hospital. "I am very proud, but what is more impressive to me is that when she retires she would like to come back to John Day," Carolyn added. Quelland could be ready for retirement in about nine years.

The Monster Buck

By Randy Dowdy

I am an archery hunter that is very patient and cautious.

I wonder if I let go of the string right now if the arrow will hit its marked spot.

I hear the fletchings on the arrow whip past the arrow rest.

I see the arrow arch up and come down in about the right spot.

I want the arrow to hit the dime-sized target on the big mossy buck.

I am an archery hunter that is very patient and cautious.

I pretend I see the buck fall to the ground.

I feel the coarse antlers on the buck's head.

I touch his monster rack and lift up his head and show his rack to my dad as he smiles at me.

I worry that I will miss him and he will get away.

I cry if I miss and my dad glares at me.

I am an archery hunter that is very patient and cautious.

I understand he will forgive me if I miss.

I said, "I tried my best."

I dream of having my picture taken with my bow leaned up against the animal and my head held up high.

I try to focus on the positive.

I hope the buck collapses in its steps.

I am an archery hunter that is very patient and cautious.

Randy Dowdy is a 13-year-old seventh-grader at Mt. Vernon Middle School. This poem will be published this fall by the International Library of Poetry. Dowdy also received editor's choice award for his submission.

About 80 people joined the celebration this fall to honor Betty Jo Pillar, retiring Magone Lake host. Pillar has served campers for 15 years at the popular Grant County destination. An engraved bench was placed at the lake in her honor.

"She was truly surprised by the picnic and especially the bench - actually speechless when we unveiled it," said friend Len Parsons.

"If you wish to appear agreeable in society, you must consent to be taught many things which you know already."- Charles Maurice de Tallyrand.

If you have interesting tid-bits about Grant County people, contact Heather at 575-0710 or e-mail heather@bluemountaineagle.com.

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